Announcement

Collapse

Terms of Use Agreement

1. You agree, through your use of these public Forums, not to post any material which is unlawful, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, sexually orientated, abusive, hateful, harassing, threatening, harmful, invasive of privacy or publicity rights, inflammatory or otherwise objectionable. You also agree not to post any copyrighted material unless the copyright is owned by you. You further agree not to use these public Forums for advertising or other commercial enterprise purposes. Any questions directed to, or concerning the administration of this website, will be sent to admin@popasmoke.com and not posted to the public Forums.

2. All postings express the views of the author, and neither the administrators nor POPASMOKE will be held responsible for the content of any postings submitted by the Members or anyone else. The administrators of these Forums reserve the right to remove, edit, move or close any postings for any reason. Members who make postings on the Forums which are not in accordance with the Terms of Use Agreement, risk having their posting privileges withdrawn.
See more
See less

Hill 488

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hill 488

    I am sure you guys heard about the fight on Hill 488. A platoon of recon Marines where scouting enemy troop movements and stayed 1 night to long. They were surrounded by what they thought was a battalion of NVA regulars, by the end of the night they where reduced to throwing rocks at the enemy. Just like the cover of the book says- they held there ground. But that was made a hell of a lot easier (but was in no way easy for the guys on the ground) to do by the Helicopter pilots who gave them cover till dawn came. Excellent book and tells you how damn tough the Marines of the United States are.

    Have a good Labor Day guys.

    Bill D.
    Qui me Tangent Paenetabit

    Stories From Vietnam
    Forum
    Photo Gallery

  • #2
    Medal Of Honor Citation

    I am unsure what your question is?


    FYI

    Citation:



    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his own life above and beyond the call of duty. G/Sgt. Howard and his 18-man platoon were occupying an observation post deep within enemy-controlled territory. Shortly after midnight a Viet Cong force of estimated battalion size approached the Marines' position and launched a vicious attack with small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire. Reacting swiftly and fearlessly in the face of the overwhelming odds, G/Sgt. Howard skillfully organized his small but determined force into a tight perimeter defense and calmly moved from position to position to direct his men's fire. Throughout the night, during assault after assault, his courageous example and firm leadership inspired and motivated his men to withstand the unrelenting fury of the hostile fire in the seemingly hopeless situation. He constantly shouted encouragement to his men and exhibited imagination and resourcefulness in directing their return fire. When fragments of an exploding enemy grenade wounded him severely and prevented him from moving his legs, he distributed his ammunition to the remaining members of his platoon and proceeded to maintain radio communications and direct air strikes on the enemy with uncanny accuracy. At dawn, despite the fact that 5 men were killed and all but 1 wounded, his beleaguered platoon was still in command of its position. When evacuation helicopters approached his position, G/Sgt. Howard warned them away and called for additional air strikes and directed devastating small-arms fire and air strikes against enemy automatic weapons positions in order to make the landing zone as secure as possible. Through his extraordinary courage and resolute fighting spirit, G/Sgt. Howard was largely responsible for preventing the loss of his entire platoon. His valiant leadership and courageous fighting spirit served to inspire the men of his platoon to heroic endeavor in the face of overwhelming odds, and reflect the highest credit upon G/Sgt. Howard, the Marine Corps, and the U.S. Naval Service.
    Semper Fidelis

    George T. Curtis

    Comment


    • #3
      That is exactly what I am talking about. I wasn't asking a question, just making an observation after reading the book. Thanks for replying and sorry for the misunderstanding.

      Bill D.
      Last edited by thatguy; 09-06-2004, 10:22.
      Qui me Tangent Paenetabit

      Stories From Vietnam
      Forum
      Photo Gallery

      Comment


      • #4
        I have read the book and I had the pleasure of meeting and knowing 1stSgt Jimmie Howard at MCRD San Diego while I was serving as a Drill Instructor. Having read the book, it gave me a greater respect for thos guys on the hill. Jimmie Howard was harder than woodpecker lips. Incidently once you pick up this book and begin to read, beware.... you can't put it down.

        A terrific read

        SemperFi, K.D. Logue 1stSgt USMC (Ret)

        Comment


        • #5
          book title

          What is the title of the book you refer to?
          Deborah

          Comment

          Working...
          X