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V-22 Accident MCAS New River

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  • V-22 Accident MCAS New River

    MARINE CORPS AIR STATION NEW RIVER, N.C. - The Marine Corps said Monday it was investigating an accident with an MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft that damaged its right wing and engine.

    No one was injured, either on board the aircraft or on the ground at the air base at Jacksonville, the Corps said in a statement.

    "The aircraft damage resulted from an inadvertent takeoff followed by a hard landing" during a test flight following maintenance on the Osprey, according to the statement.

    The statement offered no further details. A base spokesman couldn't be reached by telephone.

    The Osprey was assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Training Squadron 204.

    Earlier this year, the Corps said it would begin deploying the Osprey in combat zones within a year and activated a squadron of the aircraft, which are designed to replace Vietnam-era CH-46E twin rotor helicopters.

    The aircraft takes off and lands like a helicopter but flies like an airplane.

    The aircraft program was halted for a review after crashes in 2000 that killed four Marines in North Carolina and 19 in Arizona. But the $19 billion program was restarted by the Pentagon last year

  • #2
    Call me .......

    an old fossil, worry wart that cant let go of the past and/or just resistant to change............But folks I got a bad feeling about this new turkey. Time will tell I guess........I just hope growing into it doesnt prove to expensive in the personnel dept.
    PhrogPhlyer

    Comment


    • #3
      Change is sometimes a good thing.

      Try to easy the throttle back a little, flare up, and breath. A diffrent kind of airframe, requires a diffrent type of approach and skill set. Please try to remember that next time anyone feels apt to jump on the bureaucratic band wagon, and start believing everything the media like to spit out.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Josh Honey
        Try to easy the throttle back a little, flare up, and breath. A diffrent kind of airframe, requires a diffrent type of approach and skill set. Please try to remember that next time anyone feels apt to jump on the bureaucratic band wagon, and start believing everything the media like to spit out.
        Are you implying by this statement that this incident was "Operator Error"?
        Since you seem to be dialed in to the MV-22, maybe you can answer a question I asked back in the 80's, WHAT DEFENSIVE ARMAMENT WILL THE OSPREY CARRY? Is the answer still, "we'll resolve that milestone later"?
        Maybe the 46's will be retasked as Gunships to fly escort.

        Comment


        • #5
          46 can't keep up. Give the damn A/C a chance. It will carry no armament.
          The 46 was a piece of crap when it first hit the fleet. It worked out.

          K.D.

          Comment


          • #6
            Easy Up.

            MR. Collins
            The V-22 Osprey was and still is designed as a life saving platform. Medivac, troop transport, supply, ect. Armament? No. Not at this time. Except for the trial runs for the ramp door, with a 50. But that is all left to the "Teams' to decide. The military has expressed some desire for armament, but is more interested in total AC versitility. And with that in mind, some have expressed desire to agument the Osprey fleet with AH-1Z Cobra support (if and when needed). Versitility and flexability are the name of the game today.
            As for "Operator Error" NO! Stop trying to assign fault to any issue with an airframe that may come up. Aircraft, and pilots, have bad days. Guess what...that's why they invented the maintainer. And this really nifty invention called a tool box. And , wait....just think...supply personal to get the maintainer a part.. Oh, even better...let's assign an entire division of maintainers to take care of these "unexpected issues".. WHAT A FRIKIN CONCEPT, HUH? Think before you open your comm receptical next time.

            Comment


            • #7
              Change is all that will be.

              Those of you, who are obviously locked into the past, should start using your imaginations. One thing is sure. The Osprey doesn't need or require old old old type weapons. Machine guns and rockets are of 'my' era. The future probably will include lasers and very light weapons, also carried by the troops aboard the Osprey. (port holes??) Even back in '65' when I pulled down my first sighting device in the UHie--round circle with cross hairs--a little voice told me that it was obsolete. Take a small read of the present and imagine the future-----The airborne laser would fire a Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser, or COIL, invented at Phillips Lab in 1977. The laser's fuel consists of the same chemicals found in hair bleach and Drano - hydrogen peroxide and potassium hydroxide - which are then combined with chlorine gas and water. The laser operates at an infrared wavelength of 1.315 microns, which is invisible to the eye. By recycling chemicals, building with plastics and using a unique cooling process, the COIL team was able to make the laser lighter and more efficient while - at the same time - increasing its power by 400 percent in five years. The flight-weighted ABL module would be similar in performance and power levels to the multi-hundred kilowatt class COIL Baseline Demonstration Laser (BDL-2) module demonstrated by TRW in August 1996. As its name implies, though, it would be lighter and more compact than the earlier version due to the integration of advanced aerospace materials into the design of critical hardware components. For the operational ABL system, several modules would be linked together in series to achieve ABL's required megawatt-class power level.
              Wayne---(cross trained aviator)(military time-1945 to 1979)
              Wayne Hazelbaker

              Comment


              • #8
                Evacs

                Wayne, now waiting for the levitation of wounded into our advanced bird!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Sorry but they can't come

                  Men
                  We had one of the V-22's comming to FW, but got news yesterday that they can't make it. The Sqd. at New River is due to rotate to Iraq soon and need to get ready. They said sorry, maybe next time.
                  Pass the news to those that were looking forward to this event.
                  Roy
                  The time, the inclination, and the where-with-all

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by donc
                    an old fossil, worry wart that cant let go of the past and/or just resistant to change............But folks I got a bad feeling about this new turkey. Time will tell I guess........I just hope growing into it doesnt prove to expensive in the personnel dept.
                    DONC: I was in an Army reserve unit in MI that flew Hueys that were older than "most" of the pilots that flew them. Of course, I was not one of them, but had to snicker during preflight when the younger kids remarked about the data plate.

                    Hooper

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Roy Pitt
                      Men
                      We had one of the V-22's coming to FW, but got news yesterday that they can't make it. The Sqd. at New River is due to rotate to Iraq soon and need to get ready. They said sorry, maybe next time.
                      Pass the news to those that were looking forward to this event.
                      Roy
                      Good LORD! THe Osprey in Iraq! Roll out the body bags. This is not good!
                      (Unless of course, you hold stock in the mfg company that fills the replacement A/C).

                      Hooper

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Take Off and Landings.

                        I had an inadvertent take-off once----quickly followed by an inadvertent landing. It was quite exciting actually.

                        I was witness to the F-22 Raptor at Oshkosh this August. I am unable to express the state of awe I was in seeing the aerial demonstration (2 A/C section) Point being, I am an old rotor head bubba and fixed wing never has done a thing for me, but this aircraft is amazing----and I'm very impressed with new technology. I just can't get by being low and slow in an Osprey in a hostile triple A enviroment and expect the A/C to survive. USMC should have adhered to the old KISS axiom, because that is what has aways worked for us. Simple, easy to operate and maintain, hard to shoot down, and blade tape is a temporary fix to just about anything. The Harrier is OK I guess, but it never really worked out. 53E's now cost something like 40K/hr in operational costs. We have to get a bigger bang for the buck and stop having politicians cram weapons systems down our throats that we don't want nor need.

                        T. Constantine
                        VMO-5, VMO-6, HML-267

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I just can't get by being low and slow in an Osprey in a hostile triple A enviroment and expect the A/C to survive.
                          Well, that's kind of the point of a hybrid tiltrotor: fly up and away at 250 knots and 10,000 feet until you get to the objective. Land, pick up the load or drop it, then up&away again to RTB or next LZ.

                          TC
                          Semper Fidelis means Semper Fidelis

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