Announcement

Collapse

Terms of Use Agreement

1. You agree, through your use of these public Forums, not to post any material which is unlawful, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, sexually orientated, abusive, hateful, harassing, threatening, harmful, invasive of privacy or publicity rights, inflammatory or otherwise objectionable. You also agree not to post any copyrighted material unless the copyright is owned by you. You further agree not to use these public Forums for advertising or other commercial enterprise purposes. Any questions directed to, or concerning the administration of this website, will be sent to admin@popasmoke.com and not posted to the public Forums.

2. All postings express the views of the author, and neither the administrators nor POPASMOKE will be held responsible for the content of any postings submitted by the Members or anyone else. The administrators of these Forums reserve the right to remove, edit, move or close any postings for any reason. Members who make postings on the Forums which are not in accordance with the Terms of Use Agreement, risk having their posting privileges withdrawn.
See more
See less

V-22 in Theatre

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Joe Reed
    replied
    belts?

    I'm guessing then, that you gents didn't use gunners belts back then that would have prevented him from falling out of the A/C?
    That would be a negative....For a Crew Chief to be encumbered with a belt with all we did in a CH-46 it would have been quite an ordeal!! We did use them on the odd times we had a tail gunner!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Amtower
    replied
    Gunner's belts?

    "Wild",

    From your avatar, I can see that you were associated with 53s.

    In my time flying as a gunner in 53s in '67 & '68, I can't recall
    anyone wearing a gunner's belt.

    The only connection with the helo was the ICS cords.

    Of course, the pilot & CP were strapped in.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Snide
    replied
    Originally posted by Joe Reed View Post
    Walt,
    Darrell Tygart was leaning on the CC door when they lifted off of a Carrier during his second tour with HMM-165! He fell out on the flight deck from WAY Up there! Shattered his L/arm and wrist and had t be med-evaced for advanced surgery. You just can't trust those latches!
    I'm guessing then, that you gents didn't use gunners belts back then that would have prevented him from falling out of the A/C?

    Leave a comment:


  • Dale A Riley
    replied
    Lost the Crew Chief

    Just ask John "Ace" Hunt about those latches. I was just reading his story last week that Wally Beddoe did.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joe Reed
    replied
    Losing the Crew Chief

    Another time I saw the crew chief get left on the flightdeck as the pilot took off before he was backl aboard his ac, the long cord broke after allmost pulling his head off. SF
    Walt is offline Report Post
    Walt,
    Darrell Tygart was leaning on the CC door when they lifted off of a Carrier during his second tour with HMM-165! He fell out on the flight deck from WAY Up there! Shattered his L/arm and wrist and had t be med-evaced for advanced surgery. You just can't trust those latches!

    Leave a comment:


  • Walt
    replied
    ON the Carb cruise before we deployed to Viet Nam . We had a pratice invasion while it was stll dark. The squids missed one chain on the left landing gear ,as the ac lifted off it hung for a second before the chain broke then all most went in sea side ways , scared the hell out of the crew and everone on the flight deck. That was as close as I ever saw of one going into the sea . Another time I saw the crew chief get left on the flightdeck as the pilot took off before he was backl aboard his ac, the long cord broke after allmost pulling his head off. SF

    Leave a comment:


  • Joe Reed
    replied
    Step 2

    In HMM-165 on the Valley Forge (2/68) we had a crew find out! As the HAC headed out past the bow of the ship he lost an engine. Full load of troops and full load of fuel! The Navy made him fly the entire "Delta" pattern to get back to the ship, when they approached below the flight deck until and last "burst" of power from the CH-46A got them aboard, albeit with some rotor damage to that and two other parked a/c since they were unable to "sideslip" aboard due to lack of Nr!! Puckered everyone's fanny, but all walked away. We changed some blades and rotor heads (3) and one engine

    Leave a comment:


  • mike sullivan
    replied
    Ray... You never slid sideways over the water untill you had sufficient out of ground effect power to stay above the deck. If you didn't you kicked out some of your load, With the ship steaming into the wind I don't ever recall having to do that. Now on a hot day in an LZ with 22 troops and full fuel load, well.... that's another story..... Your post brings back a lot of old memories...s/f

    Leave a comment:


  • Ray Norton
    replied
    A thought

    It appears that the Ospreys take off from a large deck by flying forward.

    What a wonderful idea.

    I recall the H46 ship departure procedure under these conditions as follows:

    1. Lift into a hover over the deck in ground effect. Check guages and insure adequate power.

    2. Slide sideways over the water. Make certain that the helicopter also has enough power to hover out of ground effect.

    3. Proceed on course.

    It was never clear to me what to do if the check in step 2 failed.

    Leave a comment:


  • steve7680768
    replied
    Thanks to all of you..
    The pictures are really very great...

    Leave a comment:


  • accs
    replied
    VMM-263 (MV-22B Osprey) Photos from aboard the USS Wasp LHD-1

    [SIZE="3"]If you haven't seen this link you should.


    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1914019/posts
    [/SIZE]

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    new photo posted.

    http://www.popasmoke.com/visions/image.php?source=11453

    Leave a comment:


  • racing agent
    replied
    Originally posted by beddoe View Post
    From: malcolmedwina@bellsouth.net
    [mailto:malcolmedwina@bellsouth.net]
    Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2007 3:22 PM
    Subject: V-22 in Theatre

    OOOOOOOOORRRRAAAAAAAAHHHHH! Thanks to Art Sifuentes for the picture. Wish I was there with them. Semper Fi, Y'all.

    http://www.popasmoke.com/images/thundermark.jpg
    Check out the CH-46's to the right of the Osprey! Still crazy after all these years. Those things were built during the Viet Nam war and still pulling! Carry On!

    Leave a comment:


  • racing agent
    replied
    Great to see this awesome bird

    I was part of the restoration crew that restored Mike Clausen's CH-46 dedicated in Charlotte, NC the Weekend of Oct, 20.

    The Marine Corps sent one of the V-22 Osprey's to Charlotte to be part of the Static Display next to the CH-46, known as Blood, Sweat, & Tears.

    The two Aircraft standing next to each other was a magnificent sight, and was very impressive for all who saw it. Particularly impressive was the landing and the takeoff of the Osprey. What a sight.

    OORAH! Marine Corps! VMM-263 will be well received by the Marines and should be feared by the Enemy. I know the crew that I met in Charlotte, and the Marines who crew this Aircraft will do us proud. Carry 0n!

    Dennis A. Craycraft
    Last edited by racing agent; 10-31-2007, 11:54.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X