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AH-1W Super Cobra

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Go Here....

    https://www.asianimportsinc.com/models_order.asp?ID=732

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Wilkening
    replied
    1st Plane Captain

    Neal,

    You’re not that old. In 1970 I became the first “NATOPS Qualified” AH-1G plane captain in the Marine Corps while serving on the flight line with HML-367. I was also a plane captain on VMO-2’s flight line in 1969 but, there were no NATOPS qualifications at that time. SEMPER FI, Jim Wilkening, Former Sgt. HML-367

    Leave a comment:


  • Neal Stapel
    replied
    AH1W Super Cobra's early beginnings

    I was a hydraulics technician attached to China Lake from HMLA 169 in
    1986. I had the honor of evaluating the retro fitted "T" model to a Super Cobra. We exposed the aircraft to extreme conditions i.e. Yuma Army Proving Grounds (desert) and Bridgeport Ca. (mountainous).

    I was called back to 169 early to deploy on a wespac aboard the USS Tarawa LHA/1. I was also present when the first production modles ("W") that arrived at Camp Pendleton shortly after returning from my wespac.

    I hope this might clear up any questions. It's hard to believe that the "W" is already being replaced. I'm old...

    Leave a comment:


  • sahand_137
    replied
    Ah-1w

    Dear sir or madam:
    AH-1W is a military and attack helicopter.Please go in www.bellhelicopter.com

    Leave a comment:


  • Ryan
    replied
    Originally posted by Mario Maia
    Dear Sir,

    I´m Brazilian plastic model builder and I´m searching for AH-1W to
    build one model in 1:72 scale.
    I need photos and drawings to complete my project: Build one AH-1W in
    SAND collor on Desert Storm Operation.
    One friend indicated me Your page: http://www.popasmoke.com but I
    didn´t find the AH-1W in this collor.
    Would You have same information about this helicopter and send me?
    Other question: Did the AH-1W operated in Desert Storm used the
    Sidewinders?

    Thanks in advanced
    Best regards
    Mario Maia
    maia_mario@yahoo.com.br
    Brazil
    Go here

    http://www.aircraftresourcecenter.com/

    and here

    http://www.helikitnews.com/

    Leave a comment:


  • Mario Maia
    replied
    AH-1W in SAND collor

    Dear Sir,

    I´m Brazilian plastic model builder and I´m searching for AH-1W to
    build one model in 1:72 scale.
    I need photos and drawings to complete my project: Build one AH-1W in
    SAND collor on Desert Storm Operation.
    One friend indicated me Your page: http://www.popasmoke.com but I
    didn´t find the AH-1W in this collor.
    Would You have same information about this helicopter and send me?
    Other question: Did the AH-1W operated in Desert Storm used the
    Sidewinders?

    Thanks in advanced
    Best regards
    Mario Maia
    maia_mario@yahoo.com.br
    Brazil

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperCobra
    replied
    The Oki swapout of Js to Ws must have happened sometime during the next cycle because when I got to 367 at Camp Pendleton in 88 they were all AH-1Ws except for one J hangar queen. We deployed to Oki in 89 and the Ws were there already.
    Randy

    Leave a comment:


  • Slick
    replied
    267 Det A didn't take any acft with them when we relieved 367.

    Leave a comment:


  • Top A
    replied
    Those 8 J's in Oki were slated to come home in fall of 87 with HMLA-369, when HMLA-267 took first W's over. Not sure if it happen.

    Leave a comment:


  • hma1369
    replied
    If memory serves me, at least one of the J's in OKI's only time in the states was when it came off the Bell assembly line. From there to RVN then to Okinawa. Also seem to recall we couldn't hang anything on one of its stations. Something about ghosts and inadvertant "pickle." Made for interesting scheduling.
    That was probably 157757, the first J model. HMA-369 passed it on to HML-367 when they were relocated from Oki to Pendleton (Apr 77). I was there from June to December 1977 with HMA-369 Det A and I think it was in a "down" status the entire time for avionics problems. We had six or eight Js and that was the only one that wasn't flown.

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperCobra
    replied
    AH-1W Lineage

    No AH-1Js were converted to AH-1Ws except in a round about way. The first two AH-1Ts were actually made from the last two AH-1Js that were on the production line. I don't know how far down the line they were at the time. One of those first two aircraft is still flying as an AH-1W at China Lake. As far as I know the all AH-1Ts were made into W. Just like all Ws will be made into AH-1Zs. I don't think there are any Ts left anywhere. Doubt you'll ever see a W in a museum either. We'll reuse them as Zs. Quite a few AH-1Js in museums and on display, just off the top of my head: Pensacola, Pax River, Intrepid, Patriots Point, Charlotte, Miramar, Quantico, and Camp Pendleton. I rescued the one at Camp Pendleton from the CFR pit there in 1997 and took all of the bumps off it and backdated it to 1970s ERA. Later they put the MARHUK scheme on it as it was one of the MARHUK Bunos. When I was looking for parts for this project I ran across the first J, 157757, in the CFR pit in Yuma. It was pretty far gone but could have been saved by a museum with the resources. I tried to find a home for it but no one wanted it. It's gone now - probably scrap. At the time there were also 30 some Js in the boneyard at Davis Monthan. Even though they were going strike all of them they still wanted to charge me for the parts to rebuild the Camp Pendelton J.
    Randy

    Leave a comment:


  • Slick
    replied
    If memory serves me, at least one of the J's in OKI's only time in the states was when it came off the Bell assembly line. From there to RVN then to Okinawa. Also seem to recall we couldn't hang anything on one of its stations. Something about ghosts and inadvertant "pickle." Made for interesting scheduling.

    Leave a comment:


  • Top A
    replied
    Outstanding Article Al
    Additionally in 86/87 if memory serves there were only a few proudtion AH1W's all others were converterted/remade AH-1T's and AH-1J's BHT moded the tailboom to W's spec and them and DOD called it a conversion acft. HMA-169 at Pendleton was first to get the Moded W's in late 86 and in Jun 87 HML-267, redis to HMLA-267 got it's first W's as they started send J's to BHT for conversion. HMLA-267 was scheduled to take rhose first W's to Okinawa in Oct 87 to replace the RVN era AH-1J's there, those J's had been in westpac since 1971 time frame.

    Leave a comment:


  • Al Barbour
    replied
    AH-1Z Super Cobra - Next Generation

    A four bladed version of the AH-1W, designated the AH-1Z, is also under development; the addition of the extra blades dramatically improves the performance envelope of the AH-1W. Currently, the AH-1W is being retrofitted with a Kollsman-manufactured Night Targeting System (NTS). The aircraft is also undergoing a cockpit reconfiguration to allow for easier copilot/gunner access to the NTS. The upgrade of the AH-1W, including the new cockpit, is referred to as the Four Bladed AH-1W (4BW) and the upgrade of the UH-1N drive train is referred to as the Four Bladed UH-1N (4BN). Collectively, the 4BN/4BW effort constitutes the USMC H-1 Upgrades Program.

    The Marine Corps plans to upgrade 180 of the AH-1W gunships to the new AH-1Z standard. The first flight was conducted in December 2000, to be followed by low-rate initial production beginning in February 2002, with deliveries running from 2004 through 2013.

    In July 1998, Bell Helicopter competitively selected Lockheed Martin for development of the AH-1Z Target Sight System (TSS). The TSS provides advanced third generation thermal image processing, eye-safe laser range finding, target designation, and full fire control integration. In August 1998, four AH-1Ws were delivered to Bell Helicopter for conversion into AH-1Z test aircraft. In September 1998, engineers completed a highly successful critical design review of the airframe, which featured a state-of-the-art, computer generated electronic mock-up to convey design details. The design review paved the way for manufacturing development. Also in 1998, the program delivered seven AH-1Ws to the Marine Corps, bringing the current aircraft inventory to 201. Additionally, several other improvements for the AH-1W (night targeting system and communications/navigation) continued.

    This program combines upgrades of two USMC H-1 aircraft: the AH-1W Cobra attack helicopter and the UH-1N light utility helicopter. The common element of the two will be identical twin engines and drive trains, including a new four-bladed rotor previously developed but not fielded. In addition, the AH-1 attack helicopter will gain a new integrated cockpit and night targeting system. The upgrade will extend the life of the H-1 two models well into the 21st century. The AH-1 will contribute to precision engagement and full-dimensional protection; the UH-1 will provide support to focused logistics.

    Bearingless, composite main rotor systems were successfully tested at BHTI in the early 1980’s and are now standard on the Bell 430 helicopter. Based on the performance of this remarkable rotor system, the USMC decided to incorporate it in their new AH-1Z helicopter. This unique rotor system provides unprecedented agility, substantially increased speed, a smoother ride, a more stable weapons platform, and excellent reliability. It will also reduce crew fatigue and enhance combat mission effectiveness.

    A Sikorsky Bearingless Main Rotor (SBMR) was successfully tested in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test section of the NASA Ames National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC). This five-bladed 44-foot diameter demonstrator rotor system was designed using existing S-76 composite main rotor blades and a new five-bladed hub, employing design features similar to the rotor proposed for the RAH-66 Comanche. The rotor was first tested on the Sikorsky Main Rotor Whirl Stand, concluding in August 1991. A Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was then signed to perform a wind tunnel test at Ames. Under the MOA, Sikorsky performed additional qualification testing and analysis to support the test program. NASA provided technical support during the pre-test effort and then tested the rotor system for a 14-week period during the summer of 1992.

    Under the 4BW/4BN fully integrated cockpits will be phased into the development after initial work on the drive system is underway. Initial work will consist of simultaneous design efforts for the 4BW and 4BN. Major modifications include: a new rotor system with semi-automatic bladefold of the new composite rotor system, a new performance matched transmission, a new 4-bladed tail rotor and drive system, a more effective stabilizer, upgraded landing gear, tail pylon structural modifications and common cockpits.

    This remanufacture will add 10,000 flight hours to 4BW/4BN airframes. The 4BW will increase aircraft maneuverability, speed, and payload (ordnance) capability. The fully integrated cockpits will reduce operator workload and improve situational awareness, thus increasing safety. It will provide growth potential for future weapon systems and avionics, which would increase mission effectiveness and survivability. As discrete systems have previously been added to both aircraft, pilot workload has progressively worsened. The cockpits will include integration of on-board mission planning, communications, digital fire control, self navigation, night targeting, and weapons systems in nearly identical crew stations reducing training requirements. The 4BN effort will incorporate the 4BW rotor system into the UH-1N aircraft, as well as a fully integrated cockpit common with the 4BW, maximizing commonality between the two aircraft and providing needed improvements in crew and passenger survivability, payload, power available, endurance, range, airspeed, maneuverability and supportability.

    The 4BN/4BW program was instituted in the summer of 1996 by combining several lesser upgrades planned but not executed by the Marine Corps. Prior to entry into EMD in September, 1996, DOT&E approved the program's alternative LFT&E plan and USD(A&T) approved a waiver from full-up, system-level LFT&E. The AH-1W will be tested full-up, system-level; the UH-1N received a waiver from full-up, system-level testing. The H-1 Upgrade ORDs require that both helicopters be tolerant to impacts by 12.7mm rounds and have crashworthy enhancements. Additionally, the drive components of the AH-1W should be tolerant to 23mm rounds.

    The H-1 Upgrade has the most comprehensive and realistic aircraft LFT&E program approved to date. The program will include full-up, system-level testing of an AH-1W and testing of all but the tail (which is common to both aircraft) of the UH-1N. It will explore in detail various potential kill mechanisms related to the expected threat. The LFT&E program is integrated fully into the systems engineering effort and should yield a reasonable opportunity to incorporate improvements if deficiencies are found.

    According to DOT&E, the AH-1Z attack helicopter demonstrated a doubling in payload and a 20 percent increase in range and endurance over the AH-1W aircraft during 2003 testing. The digital cockpit enhanced pilot situational awareness and reduced workload in some areas. However, poor targeting performance of the newly installed Targeting Sight System (TSS) degraded mission effectiveness and increased pilot workload. Problems with TSS stability, focusing, target loss during field-of-view changes, and anomalous TSS behavior must be resolved before this aircraft can be considered operationally effective.

    Source: http://www.globalsecurity.org/milita...raft/ah-1z.htm

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  • Al Barbour
    replied
    AH-1W Specifications

    Contractor: Bell Helicopter TEXTRON, Inc. (Prime), General Electric, Kollsman Inc.
    Power Plant: Two General Electric T700-GE-401 Turboshaft engines
    Each engine delivers 1,690 horsepower.

    Accommodations: Two seats, in tandem (pilot in rear, copilot/gunner in front)

    Performance: Climb rate: 1,925 feet per minute
    Maximum altitude: 14,750 feet
    Maximum attainable speed: 170 knots (195 mph)
    Maximum cruising speed: 152 knots (173 mph)

    Countermeasures: AN/ALE-39 Chaff system and SUU-4/1 Flare dispensers

    Armament: One M197 three barrel 20 mm gun (mounted under the nose with 750 round ammo container)
    Underwing attachments for four TOW missiles, eight Hellfire missiles, or one AIM-9L Sidewinder missile
    Can also be equipped with Zuni rocket launchers

    Source: http://www.globalsecurity.org/milita...ah-1-specs.htm

    Leave a comment:

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